Bronze and mosaic relief designed by Thomas Jay Warren.

Let's Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War
Making Sense of the American Civil War

African American soldier and family, circa 1863-65The Denver Public Library is one of 150 libraries nationwide that will be hosting this new 5-part discussion series called "Let's Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War." It will use books and scholar-led discussion as an entry into serious thought, discussion, and further reading. It will also offer an occasion to bring diverse groups together at the library to examine the modern implications of the Civil War and emancipation through a mix of readings and discussions. Discover this pivotal period of American history with your community. This series is a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.

Image: African American soldier and family, circa 1863-65.

Lecture and Discussion at Blair-Caldwell Library:

Woman wearing mourning brooch, circa 1861-65 Moderating Scholar: Dr. Patricia Richard, Associate Professor of History, Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Saturday, September 8, 2012 at 2 p.m.
Saturday, September 15, 2012 at 2 p.m.
Saturday, September 22, 2012 at 2 p.m.
Saturday, September 29, 2012 at 2 p.m.
Saturday, October 6, 2012 at 2 p.m.
Wrap-Up Discussion Panel: Monday, October 8, 2012 at 6 p.m.

Book Selections:
March by Geraldine Brooks
Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam by James M. McPherson
America's War: Talking About the Civil War and Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries by Edward Ayers

Image: Woman wearing mourning brooch, circa 1861-65.

Wrap-Up Discussion Panel

Monday, October 8, 2012 at 6 p.m.

Join us for a concluding panel discussion focusing on the past and present effects of the Civil War on African Americans. Each panelist will present their perspective followed with a Q&A session. No registration required for the wrap-up panel.

Panelist Bios:

Winston Grady-Willis is professor and chair of African and African American Studies at Metropolitan State University of Denver. He earned a B.A. in history from Columbia, an M.P.S. in Africana Studies from Cornell, and a Ph.D. in history from Emory. Prior to coming to MSU Denver he was Director of Intercultural Studies and associate professor of American Studies at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York. While at Syracuse University, where he taught and labored in the Department of African American Studies, he received the Meredith Teaching Recognition Award. His book, Challenging U.S. Apartheid: Atlanta and Black Struggles for Human Rights, 1960-1977 (Duke), seeks to provide a gendered examination of the contemporary Black Freedom movement. His articles have appeared in Presence Africaine, The Black Panther Party Reconsidered and Black Prison Movements, USA.

Carnita Groves, a Denver native, earned a B.A. in psychology from UCD, a M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the College of Education at DU and completed two years of doctoral study at DU’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology before leaving the program. She was a third-year counseling psychology doctoral student at Argosy University (Denver) before having to leave on family medical emergency. Carnita is a three-term president of the Denver Rocky-Mountain Association of Black Psychologists (D-RMABPsi). Nationally, she co-chaired the Health Committee of the association’s General Assembly for three years. She writes integrative mental health articles for the Denver Black Pages and will soon publish her first book of poetry. Aside from being an avid organic gardener, Carnita has taught psychology at three area colleges and operates a private practice (www.AtwellandGroves.net), which includes forensic evaluation support, integrative mental health, and psycho-nutrition. She is married to Dr. Robert Atwell, former national and Denver chapter ABPsi president and area clinical-forensic psychologist. Together, they have 10 children and 10 grandchildren.

Derrick Hudson is an Assistant Professor of International Relations in the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies at the Colorado School of Mines, where he teaches undergraduate courses in International Relations, African History and in the Masters of International Political Economy of Resources (MIPER) program. He earned his Ph.D. in International Relations from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. He specializes in religion and politics in Africa, with particular expertise on the role of prophetic Christianity as an agent for social change in selected historically deeply divided societies. His teaching interests also include the role of truth commissions as societies are in transition from authoritarian to democratic rule. His next major project will explore the transition processes as southern Sudan declares its independence in 2011.

William M. King is Professor emeritus of Afroamerican Studies. He recently retired from the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder where he taught for forty years. His doctorate in interdisciplinary social science was received from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. He is the author of two books, Going to Meet a Man: Denver's Last Legal Public Execution, 27 July 1886 and How to Write Research Papers: A Guide for the Insecure. Additionally, he has authored numerous book chapters, articles, essays, reviews, reports and other materials that have appeared in a wide variety of scholarly and popular media. Meanwhile, he continues his work crafting a history of Denver's black community.

Five Civil War Union soldiersRegistration:

Registration for the lecture series is closed.
No registration required for the wrap-up panel.

More Information:

Please contact the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library at 720-865-2401 or blairstaff@denverlibrary.org for more information.

Image: Five Civil War Union soldiers.

 

Colorado Humanities

National Endowment for the Humanities

American Library Association

Let's Talk About It!

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Bronze and mosaic relief designed by Thomas Jay Warren.
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